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Special Topics



ARTH 290.02 - Maymester (3)
Film Noir/Neo Noir
Instructor:
Frank Cossa
843-953-8226

A study of the influential genre of American film that flourished in the 1940s & ‘50s. Dubbed “film noir” by French critics for characteristically dark cinematography, and no less shady plots (heists, murder, political chicanery, gangsters, crooked cops, and the inevitable femme fatale in strange hats) these films exposed the dark underbelly of American life in the post WW II era. Some of the leading Directors of the day: John Huston, Billy Wilder, Raoul Walsh, Stanley Kubrick, Orson Welles . . . worked in this genre. The course will also consider the noir revival of the 1970s.Classics to be studied include: Double Indemnity,The Postman Always Rings Twice, The Asphalt Jungle, White Heat, The Killing, Out of the Past; for neo-noir: The Long Goodbye (Altman), Body Heat (Kasdan) Chinatown (Polanski). Students will write critical essays on the films, and master the technical vocabulary of the cinema.


ASST 240/POLI 359.01
- Maymester (3)
Chinese Politics in Film
Instructor:
Guoli Liu

This course examines Chinese politics, culture, and history through critical readings, films, and historical documentaries. We will study contending perspectives on and different approaches to Chinese politics.  Due to China’s long history and rapidly changing nature of politics, a multidisciplinary approach is appropriate for understanding contemporary China. In this intensive Maymester course, lecture and films will be combined with extensive class discussion.


ECON 360.01-Maymester (3)
Socioeconomics of Gambling
Instructor:
Douglas Walker
843-953-8192

The course provides a comprehensive analysis of the economic and social impacts of the casino industry. Examining the latest cutting-edge research, with a mix of theory and empirical evidence, the course covers the most important facets at the forefront of the public policy debate over this controversial industry. While the casino industry has continued to expand across the United States, and around the world, critics argue that casinos bring negative social impacts that offset any economic benefits. The course examines the evidence on the frequently claimed benefits and costs stemming from expansions in the casino industry, including the impact on economic growth, consumer welfare, and government tax revenues, as well as gambling disorders, crime rates, and the impact on other businesses. Students will come away with knowledge of the merits of these arguments for and against public policies that would expand casino gambling. The course is aimed at students in economics, sociology, political science, or tourism, who have an interest in casinos as a public policy issue.


HIST 250.01  – Summer I (3)
Atlantic Connections: Slaves and the Goods They Produced
Instructor: Tim Coates
843-953-8031

This class is a broad overview of the trans-Atlantic slave trade with two in depth examples.  The class will focus on slave labor in Brazil producing sugar and that same labor in South Carolina growing rice.  Students will complete the course with an understanding and appreciation of the extent of African slavery in the Americas and its social, economic, and cultural impacts.


HIST 310.01/CRLS 300.01
– Summer I (3)
History of Crime in America
Instructor: Tammy Ingram

This course uses an array of historical monographs, novels, and films to explore the contested meaning of crime in modern America. Although we will study a few well-known crimes, we will also examine incidents that have largely been forgotten. From the murder of a prostitute in the early nineteenth century to the serial killer scare of the mid-twentieth century to the increase in arrests for white collar crime over the past decade, we will examine how and why popular ideas and anxieties about crime (and criminals) have changed over time and how these changes reflect major social, political, and cultural developments in U.S. History.


HIST 350.01 - Summer Evening
(3)
The Real Pirates of the Caribbean
Instructor: Timothy Coates
843-953-8031

This course is designed to introduce students to the realities of pirates and their world of the seventeenth and eighteenth century West Indies.  Topics will include the sixteenth century Caribbean, the formation of the West Indies as sugar producing islands, Spanish silver, shipbuilding, the golden age of Caribbean piracy, pirate hangouts and culture, the end of the golden age of pirates, and their lingering romantic image. Because of the structure of this class (two nights weekly, each session is three hours), the format will be a movie on Tuesdays and a lecture/discussion/presentations by students on Thursdays.  This will allow us to explore one additional and very important aspect about pirates and that is the romantic image of pirates and piracy, largely created via films such as these. 


MKTG 360.02
-Maymester (3)
Sports Marketing
Instructor:
Yu Xie
843-953-6658

This course illuminates the theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of marketing strategies in sports-related marketing activities. The course is designed to allow students an opportunity to apply key marketing concepts, tools, and strategies within the context of sports; and to examine the use of sports for marketing and the use of marketing in sports. This course utilizes a combination of teaching methods such as lectures, projects, case studies, guest speakers, and site visits, with heavy emphasis on students’ active participation.
Prerequisites: MKTG 302, junior or senior


MUSC 222.02-May Evening (3)
Like A Rolling Stone:  History and Development of Rock Music (This is an online course)
Instructor: Yiorgos Vassilandonakis

Like A Rolling Stone will trace the origins, development and stylistic nuances of Rock music from its folk and blues beginnings via Elvis, Bob Dylan and the British invasion through the Woodstock, Motown, California surf, Psychedelic, Hippie culture, Heavy Metal, and Grunge movements, exploring the integration of Jazz, Country, Soul, Punk, Reggae & Ska, Pop, Disco, Classical, Rap, Hip-Hop and Electronica. The course will follow the transition of rock from obscure counterculture to mainstream and superstardom, from clubs to arenas and MTV, through shifts in recording technology, industry and modes of distribution, and examine its sociopolitical context, role and influence in global culture.


MUSC 222.03
-May Evening (3)
Music of the Beatles
Instructor:
Blake Stevens
843-953-5927

The Beatles have remained popular and culturally influential for fifty years, through changes of style, fashion, and generation. Why do their songs remain meaningful and popular? What makes a Beatles song work? This course explores the phenomenon of The Beatles from multiple perspectives: their early influences in blues, folk, and rock ‘n’ roll, the development of their style from album to album, their complex and provocative engagement with the culture of the 1960s, and the songs themselves as individual works of artistic expression.


MUSC 222.04
-Summer I (3)
All That Jazz:  A Guided Tour of America's Music (This is an online course)
Instructor: Yiorgos Vassilandonakis

This online course examines the rich tapestry of Jazz Music and its contributions to the historical and cultural development of our nation and beyond. Students will be introduced to its aesthetic nuances through the different styles that jazz music comprises, from the blues, ragtime, swing, bebop, through the big-band era, modal and cool jazz, the Brazilian and Afro-Cuban influences and bossa-nova, to fusion, jazz-rock, free jazz and acid jazz, as it developed from its humble beginnings in New Orleans and exploded to St. Louis, Chicago, New York and the West Coast, to Europe and the rest of the world.

PEAC 120.02-Summer I (2)
Stand-Up Paddle Boarding
Instuctor:
Thomas Carroll
843-953-4275
This course is designed to provide the student with the necessary skills and techniques to explore flat-water and the surf environment through Stand-Up Paddleboarding, one of the most exciting and fastest growing water sports in the world.  Course emphasis will be placed on proper paddling technique, safety, equipment, responsible and ecological paddling. Course venues will include the surf zones, tidal creeks and other local waterways.  
The class will culminate with one of the most unique final exams offered: an ecological paddle and river clean up.


PEAC 120.03
-Summer II (2)
Stand-Up Paddle Boarding
Instuctor:
Thomas Carroll
843-953-4275
This course is designed to provide the student with the necessary skills and techniques to explore flat-water and the surf environment through Stand-Up Paddleboarding, one of the most exciting and fastest growing water sports in the world.  Course emphasis will be placed on proper paddling technique, safety, equipment, responsible and ecological paddling. Course venues will include the surf zones, tidal creeks and other local waterways.  
The class will culminate with one of the most unique final exams offered: an ecological paddle and river clean up.


POLI 310. 01 - May Evening (3) (Cross-listed with PUBA 502.01)
Urban Applications in GIS
Instructor: Kevin Keenan

You will learn how to use ArcGIS (widely-used digital mapping and spatial analysis software) to do the following, among many other things: spatially display urban environments, define neighborhood boundaries, contrast the urban core and the edge city, study urban environmental problems, such as air pollution, study industrial location strategies, and analyze urban geographies.


POLI 399.01
- Maymester (3)
Reel Nature: Environmental Politics in Film
Annette Watson
843-953-5864

This course examines what it means to “know” nature in pop culture, and the politics that result from visually representing the environment. Students will be introduced to the history and politics of environmental film-making, in both the United States and around the globe, and class time will be divided between discussion of required readings and watching films and film clips. Students will be evaluated based on film reviews and their final projects, which may take the form of either a written term paper or visual film project.


PUBA 502.02
- May Evening (3) (Cross-listed with POLI 310.01)
Urban Applications in GIS
Instructor: Kevin Keenan

This course provides an overview of geographic information systems applied to the study of cities.  It introduces students to foundational concepts and applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and it asks students to use this software to explore and solve real-world urban problems.  Students will learn about the data and methodology for using GIS to solve urban problems in economic, social, planning, and political settings.  Topics covered include an overview of GIS data, the spatial display of data, conducting queries on data, and geocoding.  The main software used for the course is ArcGIS 10.  This course is conceptualized as one that bridges theoretical ideas with an applied skill.